A warm welcome to all friends visiting the site with a loving invitation to read my personal expressions on movies, music, poetry and life.

Music and Movies are like Ears and Eyes to me and if you also feel the same, then you are going to enjoy every moment spent on my works here, for sure.

Do send in your valuable comments and suggestions as they would be my guide for all the future works.

ENJOY!

TRAPPED - Post an unconvincing start, it fairly keeps you engaged as a praise-worthy off-beat attempt featuring an impressive solo act and some notable merits. (Review By Bobby Sing).

This Friday's One Line Reviews by Bobby Sing for making your weekend movie plans..

KONG SKULL ISLAND (English) - Though lacks an emotional pull and the original charm, it's still an incredibly made entertaining comic-book adventure to be experienced in a well-equipped theater. (Review by Bobby Sing).

BADRINATH KI DULHANIA - A unique case of the makers returning with the same lead pair, a similar title, identical looks and the same old premise of a wedding, mocking at the viewers patience & choice. (Review by Bobby Sing).

LION (English/2016) - An emotionally uplifting film which once again depicts INDIA in a bad light and we know the westerners do have a fascination for such dark representation of our country since decades. (Review by Bobby Sing).

ANUPAMA (1967) - Its touching emotional climax and DDLJ - By Bobby Sing.

COMMANDO 2 - Focusing on suspense instead of action, Vidyut gets no support in this poor and so casually conceived film unfortunately. (Review By Bobby Sing).

LOGAN (English/Hindi) - You will make faces, tighten your fists and do several things going through this brutal, cold blooded must watch thriller for sure. (Review by Bobby Sing).

RUNNING SHAADI - An average light hearted (Punjab based) film led by Tapsee Pannu, which you are sure going to enjoy watching on a TV channel instead of the costly multiplex. (Review By Bobby Sing).

RANGOON - Well shot, designed & performed but a dialogue in the film itself says, "Public SHOT nahin, FILM dekhti hai". (Review by Bobby Sing).

 
 
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March 24, 2017 Friday     
The most difficult part of a film revolving around one or two kids is to find the right ones who have a likeable screen presence, can express the emotions well and render the dialogues too as visualized by the film’s writer and director. Thankfully Nagesh Kukunoor manages to find two perfect kids to play his key characters in DHANAK and the film majorly gets lifted by them alone despite having many weak character insertions in a script based on an unoriginal theme reminding you of two earlier similar projects widely appreciated and awarded too in the festival circuit. But keeping those references for the last, let me first convey why I wasn’t that impressed from the film in spite of two remarkable child artists and a few matured acts.
DHANAK begins introducing a sweet brother and sister duo arguing over Salman and Shah Rukh Khan as their true fans. The 8 years old kid brother is not able to see and the elder sister of around 10-11 cares about him as a mother along with fighting over the issue of SRK being the best, whom she adores a lot. The film is about their journey towards Jaisalmer, where Shah Rukh is shooting for his new film and the girl wants to meet him looking for some financial help in getting her brother operated (as per the doctor’s instructions). So it’s a road movie with the kids meeting several people on the path and then reaching the destination to have a pleasant surprise.
Commencing with a couple of highly impressive scenes, the major triumph of DHANAK remains the two talented kids besides some entertaining dialogues that keep bringing the smiles and laughter in at regular intervals. Particularly it’s the charming performance of Krrish Chhabria as Chhotu that beautifully elevates up the film into a fine light hearted entertainer along with an adorable natural act by Hetal Gada as his elder sister Pari. Together the kids deliver a delightful time that doesn’t disappoint as far as the performances, good music and dialogues are concerned. But as per its basic theme and added characters into the script this doesn’t seem to be a Nagesh Kukunoor film from any angle.
(Spoilers Ahead)
In clear words, if a director of films like HYDERABAD BLUES, ROCKFORD, 3 DEEWAREN, IQBAL, DOR, AASHAYEIN and LAKSHMI offers such weak, unconvincing, stereotyped and badly conceived supporting characters in his film as seen in DHANAK, then if forces you to assume that something has drastically gone wrong either in this particular project or somewhere in these recent years quite honestly.
For instance it was shocking to see a Nagesh Kukunoor film having a female Rajasthani bandit (holding an antique kind of pistol-cum-gun) putting loads of make-up like a ramp-model blocking the road with big stones, a child-trafficker running away on a deserted road in a desert (God knows where?) leaving his SUV behind with two unconscious kids tied at the back, a wicked scary looking ‘Banjaaran’ aunt who can gaze into the future, a young Tom Alter kind of foreigner traveller forcibly trying to pose as some enlightened being wandering on earth, an eccentric/ mad man constantly walking on the lonely roads with a Car Staring in hand, and above all a fake spiritual God-woman who was earlier a struggler in Bollywood along with Shah Rukh Khan only.
Exploiting the backdrop of Rajasthan just to impress the festival audience all over the world, I personally wasn’t expecting such childish presentation of the region from the man who has a classic DOR in his repertoire that can be easily be taken as a reference material without any doubt. Yes, DHANAK has a fine cinematography offered with an enjoyable soundtrack with some good songs. But I frankly couldn’t believe hearing guitars being played in a track when the musicians on screen were all playing the traditional Indian instruments. After all that is exactly where the director comes in approving the questionable execution.
So what exactly works in DHANAK that doesn’t allow me to call it a non-performer?
It’s majorly the two outstanding kids, their pleasant and charming performances, the enjoyable dialogues (mostly by Chhotu) and one mature supporting act from Vipin Sharma. Mentioning the only few scenes I could feel connected are the ones where the kids have a friendly interaction with Vipin as their caring uncle, the sequence where Chhotu stops an ongoing truck completing a song being sung on the people on board, the marriage talks between the three kids at a night stoppage and watching the truck driver who drops them midway towards Jaisalmer emoting realistically.
Otherwise, the basic choice of theme by Nagesh disappointed me the most as I was really expecting something fresh and novel from the director who always used to come up with a new and unique subject. Giving you the exact references, a kid travelling all the way to the city to meet an icon was earlier seen in two films and in both these films, the icon was never shown on the screen with any actual footage exactly like DHANAK. So what we get to see in the climax of all these three films is the use of some clever shots that give you an impression of the icon being there having some kind of interaction or the child connecting to him in an indicative manner.
Naming them all, Raj Kapoor conceived AB DILLI DOOR NAHIN in1957 without Pt. Jawaharlal Nehru (directed by Amar Kumar), Nila Madhab Panda made I AM KALAM in 2010 without A. P. J. Abdul Kalam & now Nagesh Kukunoor makes DHANAK in 2016 without Shah Rukh Khan working on a similar pattern
So if you haven’t seen any of the two films mentioned above, then DHANAK is obviously going to be novel and enjoyable too due to the two terrific kids. But don’t expect something highly mature from the director who is ironically widely known for the same.
Rating : 2 + 1 / 5 (with the additional 1 especially for the fabulous (film saving) performances by Krrish and Hetal)
Tags : Dhanak Review by Bobby Sing, Dhanak Film Review by Bobby Sing, Inspired Films, Ab Dilli Door Nahin, I Am Kalam and Dhanak, Simialr theme films, New Bollywood Movies Released, New Hindi Films Reviews, New Hindi Movies Reviews, New Hindi Movies Released, New Bollywood Reviews, Bobby Talks Cinema Review, Reviews By Bobby Sing, New Hindi Films Reviews at bobbytalkscinema.com
 
 
22 June 2016 / bobbysing /
leave a comment
 
Glut - Documentary of PunjabThe one scene that many considered as some creative liberty taken by writer-director Abhishek Chaubey in his film UDTA PUNJAB was the very first brilliant scene where a packet is hurled from Pakistan to other side of the border in India as long as 1 kms and then the Indian carrier is supposed to pick it up from the fixed spot.
There were calls and messages simply laughing and ridiculing the scene that was referred to as a well-executed one in the BTC review, as friends were not really aware of the specific region, the exact situation and the modus operandi of the drug traffickers following an extremely well-planned strategy.  
So for all those friends who couldn’t believe in the onscreen depiction of that first sequence in UDTA PUNJAB taking it as a entirely filmy one, here is a powerful and important documentary that reveals it all with real life accounts, confessions and interviews made some 5 years back when the film was perhaps not even conceived by the makers busy in their other ventures.
Conceptualized and Directed by Sahil Bhagat and Smaran Sahu, the 32 minutes long film has been narrated by famous actor/director/player/activist Rahul Bose having a personal connection with Punjab. And it has got some severe shocking and emotional moments that are sure going to make you seriously think about the state moving much ahead than any commercial film or storyline.  
As a strong recommendation from BTC just give this valuable research work some of your precious time and get ready to amaze yourself knowing about the issue in the most truthful manner till date titled "Glut - The Untold Story of Punjab".
HIS BLESSINGS
Tags : Udta Punjabi and its first real scene, Misconceptions about Punja and its drug menace, Articles on Cinema by Bobby Sing, Rare Documentaries, Articles on Cinema at bobbytalkscinema.com
 
 
21 June 2016 / bobbysing /
leave a comment
 
The most talked about film of the year gets released amongst a big controversy fighting the ugly piracy. And with more number of people willing to know about the final outcome, its good news to be shared as UDTA PUNJAB does have a lot to offer to its viewers in terms of content and performances, along with some major avoidable insertions witnessed in its latter half.
Following the set pattern seen in the earlier two ventures of director Abhishek Chaubey (ISHQIYA and DEDH ISHQIYA), here we once again have a strong, performance driven film talking about a fresh theme where Abhishek (repeatedly) tries to impress the classes as well as the masses making some serious mistakes. Consequently, where the first half simply excels with many killer sequences, the second half isn’t able to maintain the pace and gets derailed soon heading towards a hurried and unappealing climax taking the easy way out.
To be specific, in a powerful film revolving around the burning issue of substance abuse in Punjab, its yet again the deliberately inserted romantic angles that spoil its whole spirit in the final hour and I am really unable to get why we cannot make such movies missing these (silly) clichéd love affairs focusing on the core subject?
Talking about the merits first, beginning with an eye-opener scene at the borders (that many might find hard to believe), UDTA PUNJAB grabs you within the first 15 minutes itself and then keeps you glued to the seats with the introduction of Shahid, Satish, Alia, Diljit, Kareena and Manav heading the four parallel storylines incorporated in its well-written screenplay.
(Spoliers Ahead)
Mentioning the brilliantly executed scenes in this winning part of the film (apart from the border one) just watch out for:
A. The recording studio sequence superbly mocking the RAP music scene prevailing in the Punjabi music industry at the present.
B. The scene at Police naaka with Manav Vij simply excelling playing the officer in charge.
C. Diljit talking to his younger brother wearing the green glasses.
D. Alia’s interaction with the old shopkeeper and Diljit’s brother in order to sell the packet she has found.
E. Kareena smiling at Diljit saying, “Saade Munde Te Theek Ne……. Horan De Kharaab” (Meaning: Our kids are all fine…… their kids are bad!)
F. And then the most upsetting and significant jail sequence, wherein Shahid gets thrown into a combined cell to be unexpectedly welcomed by two young boys singing his famous rap song. The boys have been following him since many years as their inspiring idol but have now reached the jail after killing their own mother in a rage missing their daily dosage.
         A thoughtfully written and executed sequence, this one scene alone brilliantly conveys the decade old disturbing scenario involving the region, its music, the icons and the younger brigade of drug addicts in just a few minutes.
Having praised the first half in length, I also found a highly objectionable projection in one particular sequence showing Punjab and its people in pretty bad light. May be, because the director wished to present his story in a pure negative form, but this actually clearly revealed his lack of study of the state or a faulty kind of research discussed in the latter part of the review in more specific details.
Post intermission, though the narration has its own share of excellence visible in the stage confession and Shahid’s sudden meeting with Alia sharing their mutual experiences (with a meaningful kiss). But a severe drop in pace and the silly addition of romance like an essential Hindi film ingredient (right in the tense moments), simply derails the film for a long duration, till a serious unexpected twist puts it back on the track saving it from a complete crash. However just when you are expecting something major to happen soon as an exciting climax, a typical Tarantino type of a hurried, abrupt ending finishes everything off and you just keep watching the end credits with a confused amazement.
Coming to the worth watching, superlative performances given by the entire cast, its Alia Bhatt who completely outshines the rest playing the unexpectedly bold and fearless character of a Bihari labour girl, who wished to play professional Hockey before her father’s untimely death. The girl simply nails it with her sad, deserted looks minus the glossy make-up and turns out to be biggest merit of the film undoubtedly.
Both Kareena & Diljit subtly underplay their given roles of a doctor and a police officer respectively as per the director’s vision but I personally found the expected fire missing from Diljit’s responsible, revolting character as projected in the film’s exciting promos. Playing an iconic rap artist, Shahid puts his best to make it as loud and repulsive as possible but remains a confused kind of character throughout without any clear detailing given for his larger than life image having a huge fan following.
Surprisingly Satish Kaushik remains wasted in the role of Shahid’s father-like-mentor roped in to provide some comic moments alone full of loud abuses. But Manav Vij proves himself as a complete natural playing the corrupt senior inspector heading Diljit and his team just superbly. Mostly shot on locations, the supporting cast (including the local Punjabi artists) never seems to be out of place, strongly reminding you of the masters at work in the casting, art and direction department. And therefore UDTA PUNJAB largely works because of its key performers without depending upon the timely publicity gifted by the censor fights.
Moving over to the 16 point questionnaire posted on Wednesday mentioning the fears and confusions in mind before the film’s release. Here are the detailed answers for the same that would precisely complete the review along with the important conclusion.
1. What is the DISCLAIMER they are putting in the beginning of the film?
The Disclaimer first explains the basic issue of drug problem in Punjab. But then in the last lines raises a big debatable concern as pointed out by CBFC too that can ideally be considered as logical.
And the concern is that if in the Disclaimer you are accepting that this is a work of fiction with no reference or relation to any real person or place in particular. Then how can one clearly use the name of key cities like Taran Taran, Jullandhar and more making a decisive impression on the viewers. In other words, if it’s all a work of fiction then the names should also be imaginary, not clearly pointing towards any specific city or person following a simple logic. Indeed there is a point here to be given a thought!
2. How close is Shahid Kapoor’s onscreen character to the famous Honey Singh and how they have indicated the same with what kind of similar reference?
Right from his odd dress up to the mannerisms given, everything straight away indicates towards the persona of Honey Singh intentionally assigned to Shahid Kapoor in the film. And the point gets further proved when he is made to sing, “Wah Wah Tommy Singh!” exactly on the lines of “Yo Yo Honey Singh!”
So though Honey Singh has not been openly associated with any serious drug issue, the film clearly takes a dig on him that can easily be considered as deliberate and just made to create a controversy in order to entertain the eager audience with some loud shouting and abuses made by Shahid Kapoor.
But in reality the exact references for this specific part of the film are also taken from IT’s ALL GONE PETE TONG (2004), which is based on the tragic life story of a famous DJ, who suddenly became deaf and then disappeared mysteriously. Interestingly the film was earlier officially remade as SOUNDTRACK (2011) in Hindi cinema and the film’s BTC review can be read at the following link.
3. What is the language spoken in the film? Is it Hindi, Punjabi or an awfully sounding mix of both? And can this be a crucial problem for the non-Punjabi speaking regions in terms of understanding the dialogues?
The language largely remains Punjabi to the extent of 80% but it still can be understood by a majority particularly in the north circuits. However this obviously will remain an issue for the other non-punjabi speaking regions of the country and that is why the film has been released with English subtitles.
At times the mix Hindi-Punjabi accent does make you feel awkward at a few places. But then most of the characters speaking in an original Punjabi tone does help in maintaining the desired authenticity.
4. How ‘Bihari workers in Punjab’ are depicted on the screen and with what purpose through the character of Alia Bhatt?
There is nothing much about this specific aspect of the present Punjab in the film. Only the first scene of Alia Bhatt shows the Bihari labourers working in the field and the Punjabi owner sitting on a cot checking the new supply of drugs. Later in the second half we are also shown the way they live along the fields as Shahid comes searching for Alia, but that’s it.
5. How convincing is the reason of Diljit’s heart transformation in the film?
Frankly, anyone is bound to change when the problem hits his own house and family members other than the neighbours. So for me this reason for Diljit’s heart transformation was the most obvious and filmy, but not a great one. Further it was quite strange to see his romantic advancements towards Kareena when the family was all disturbed having a serious drug addict at home fighting for life. Honestly in a supposedly realistic film one doesn’t fall in love with the doctor of his dying brother to be exact.
6. What impact does Kareena makes in the role of an activist/doctor?
Right from the beginning, Kareena must be knowing that she didn’t have much to do in the film and it was all about Alia, Shahid & Diljit in particular focusing on their powerful roles. So it was quite supporting of her to say yes, performing in a cool, subtle manner. But her character doesn’t make much impact in the film missing any insightful depth.
7. How are the songs used in the film and do they result in any kind of influential provocation?
This is a dangerously concerning point.
In a film based on drugs and its life threatening impact on the youth, if there ought to be any songs, then they have to be the ones pointing towards the curse and its evil impact on the individuals, families and society altogether.
BUT we cannot really have some peppy dance numbers that can easily become the anthem for the same drug addicts, for whose awareness the film is supposedly being made for.
In other words, if you are making a responsible film against the drug addiction and also coming up with a great song in it to be enjoyed while sniffing the same deadly white powder in the night clubs, then I am simply confused what are you doing or what is your exact purpose of making this film based on drug consumption?
Yes, along with "Da Da Dassey" both the tracks ‘Chitta Veh’ & ‘Andar Da Kutta’ are well-made catchy songs in musical terms.
But if I am singing the lines as,
“O Chitta Ve, Chitta Ve……. Kaiyaan Nu Hai Khush Kitta Ve”
(Meaning – Oh White Powder, You have made many happy with your effect!)
or
“Powder Ki Layino Ka Rakhega Kaun Hisaab….. Haan Udta Punjab”
(Meaning – Who will keep account of the white powder lines to be sniffed…, yes flying Punjab)
or
“Chitthdey Ve Dil De Kar Mukiye, Hasti Ki Masti Mein Sui Phukhiye”
(Meaning – Lets break our heart into pieces and lets pierce the needle in the ecstasy of fun enjoying our very existence)
then,
I really don’t know either one is OPPOSING THE DRUGS or PROMOTING IT quite honestly.
In short the songs are already HIT and that itself is the dangerous contribution made by the film in the world of DRUG ADDICTION and their future rave parties for sure.
Plus just the other day, when I heard a 12 years old innocent kid passing by the road singing, “O Chitta Ve, O Chitta Ve” I really didn’t know how to rate the success of the song standing in a highly confused state.
8. How justified is the use of Shiv Kumar Batalvi’s cult song in the script, sung by Shahid?
It was really great to find this track in the film before its release till Thursday as its a beautifully composed, sung and arranged song unarguably. But the director has actually used this poem taking its first few lines in the simple literal sense that gels well with the story proceedings in the film at that particular time.
To give you a clear idea, the sequence has Shahid searching for Alia to save her from the goons who have kidnapped her again. And in this search he thinks of this song saying,
“Ek Kudi Jihda Naam Mohabbat, Gum Hai……Gum Hai….. Gum Hai”
(Meaning : One girl with the name of Love, is lost…… lost …… lost)
Perfectly fitting the situation in the film, the song sounds too good when we hear it on the screen. But revealing the concerning point, the original cult poem of Shiv Kumar Batalvi had a completely different vision behind the verses to be studied in details reaching the desired depth.
However now since it has become just another film song for the people not really in touch with the Punjabi Literature, I fear that many would get stuck to its visual use in the film itself and would never reach the actual meaning of the poem crossing this film-song barrier.
For instance, for more than 95% of the filmgoers, the earlier poem of Shiv Kumar Batalvi used in Imtiaz Ali’s LOVE AAJ KAL as “Ajj Din Chadheya Tere Rang Varga” just remained a love song from a great film soundtrack only and nothing beyond that. And I fear the same is going to happen with “Ik Kudi” too which is actually a much more important and immensely deep creation by the master that needs to be studied and grasped as a precious gem, miles ahead of just another good film song.
Therefore using this opportunity of reaching the young minds reading this sincere write-up, I would like to request that take this song as your introduction to the world of PUNJAB’s most respected, loved, and expressive poet Shiv Kumar Batalvi and be with him for a while to understand LOVE & PAIN in its purest form ever, making a big favour to yourself to be cherished forever.
9. How clearly is Pakistan and state politicians shown linked to the drug business in Punjab?
This is the crucial point where the writer-director intentionally played just a ‘touch and go’ game missing the bigger picture. Now was it due to the fear of losing business or else, I cannot say. But the film just makes a passing reference of Pakistan in its first scene and then also easily forgets about the political link up shown in the storyline itself, ending it all with a quick and easy culmination leaving everything as it is. So despite having touched the burning issue at the very right spot, the makers decide to take the ‘Patli Gali’ and ‘get away' revealing their casual approach.
So this is another indication that the theme of Punjab and its drug issue was only used as an exciting backdrop for the film with no vision of any social reform, revolution or message to the society as such.
10. How realistic is the abusive language used in the film in its major scenes? Was it really necessary or its just thrown in for the obvious reasons?
Any kind of abusive language can only be justified in the scenes of fights, torture, scuffles in public places, road mishaps and more related with anger on the screen in particular. So where the use of heavy abuses can be accepted in such specific scenes, it clearly looks like intentional when Satish Kaushik is made to shoud out loud in the studio and in other unconvincing scenes in my personal opinion. Thus, since there are many sequences in the film that would have actually made the same kind of impact even without the use of heavy cuss words added deliberately, this all looks like a good PR activity as seen in the director’s first film released in 2010.
In fact I was surprised to notice that they did not use the trick where it would have been most appropriate as per the script requirement in the second half’s stage sequence. For example, instead of pissing, if Shahid would have just abused the whole crowd on the mike in a fit of anger, then it would have made a much more violent scene (as I have personally experienced that happening with a big star)
On a lighter or filmy note…..!
11. How funny is Satish Kaushik’s character in the film taking care of the entertainment factor?
He is funny yes, but only while shouting the abuses and no where else. Instead, he has been utterly wasted in the film doing almost nothing. If truth be told, it seems he was called in just because he is a Punjabi knowing the expressions well!
12. How is romance portrayed in the proceedings linking the various characters?
Romance turns out to be the weakest insertion in the film hindering its overall pace. And it was really surprising to find it deliberately added into the script only to make it commercial in nature that was not really expected from a director like Abhishek Chaubey.
In clear words, a police officer brother of a young drug addict falling in love with the doctor treating his dying brother……… and a failing youth icon struggling with his own career, image and drug problems falling in love with a girl he meets (once) in a deserted building while running away from the mad public and police saving his own life……..wasn't anything realistic or convincing from any angle whatsoever?
On the very purpose of the film…..!
14. Can UDTA PUNJAB be a propaganda film in disguise having some political inclinations?
No, it cannot be any propaganda film made with any specific purpose of influencing the upcoming elections or more as it doesn’t even care about either the neighbour's supply or the politicians nexus in details incorporated in the basic script.
With only some vague indications made towards the politician bosses, the director is not even interested in giving the film any revolutionary culmination and is just willing to end it all in a typical QT kind of climax (eliminating everyone involved) truly following the Vishal Bhardwaj school of filmmaking highly influenced from Tarantino, Guy Richie kind of masters since its very origin.
13. Is it a socially concerned movie made with a responsible purpose or just using the backdrop of Punjab to get some instant eyeballs and publicity?
NO, this isn't any socially concerned movie thinking about the society as a whole.
The film simply uses the backdrop of Punjab for mere commercial purposes without any clear vision as such making it pretty clear.
But yes the huge publicity does bring out the issue before the entire nation and it will be great if even one person (addict) somehow manages to get out of this vicious trap of drugs post watching Shahid and Alia.  
15. Projected as a social drive against drugs, does it also have any focus on the state of rehabilitation centers operating in the regions or just skips that considering it as unimportant?
NO, apart from the one scene where a volunteer can be seen advertising about their PRIVATE Rehabilitation Center among the hospital patients itself, the film makes no reference of the numbers or condition of Government and Non-Government rehabilitation centers operating in Punjab at all.
(Another indication of the film not made as any social drive)
And lastly but MOST IMPORTANTLY
16. How PUNJAB and the people of the state are portrayed in the film stressing upon the drug menace? Is the depiction full of negativity or they have also shown the positive side too following a balanced approach?
I mentioned a highly objectionable sequence in the early part of this review wrongly presenting Punjab and its people in all negative light. This is the scene where Alia reaches that village where she wishes to sell the packet for a good price. And just when she gets off the bus walking through the roadside, you get to see a completely wrong picture painted on the screen in terms of Punjab, its people and their very nature of life.
Now just try to visualize that scene again if you have seen the film.
Alia gets off the bus and notices every single person gazing at her like an evil hungry wolf looking at his daily meat.
An old man feeding his animals, two mechanics leaning over a car and another sitting on the rickshaw starts looking at her.
A person taking bath under the hand-pump is also staring at her scratching his underwear.
A group of men holding the bottles of beer in hand (standing by the road) keep looking at her constantly.
Another middle aged man gives her a strange angry look as she falls down on the road after accidently bumping into him, but he doesn’t pick her up.
A car is standing by the roadside full of young boys and the moment they see her running, they at once start the ignition with a motive of getting her.
They keep on following Alia till she moves into the fields and the girl goes on running in order to save herself from getting raped in the car.  
NOW THIS IS NOT PUNJAB Dear Abhishek Chaubey!
PUNJAB is not a state of all criminals as shown in this particular scene where a girl cannot even walk alone on the road fearing a random attack.
Yes Punjab has a severe drug issue, it has cases of rapes and murders reported, its witnessing a serious political uproar, it has its farmers opting suicides and it has its own problems to tackle as other agricultural regions in our country.
But the state has yet not forgotten its spirit of life and dignity as you have shown in the film.
Yes, PUNJAB has lost a major ground in the past to many avoidable negative factors, but it still hasn’t lost those positive vibes, famous all over the world (encashed by YRF in their films since last many decades).
Yet for some reason, you chose to portray it with an absolute negative vision, wherein we cannot find even one positive character in the entire film (other than Kareena playing a doctor). The field owners are shown as drug peddlers, the police officers are shown as facilitators, the politicians are shown as the conspirators and even the farmers families (including the ladies) are shown involved in drug dealing, human trafficking and prostitution supplying women to the Policemen, as if it’s a kind of CITY OF CRIME not safe to visit for any outsider.
So if there was any kind of research made before this film was conceived, then it was all flawed and possibly done by some intern kids, looking for a short summer job fetching them some quick money.
Putting it bluntly, UDTA PUNJAB is a film that at one end wishes to present itself as a well-wisher of Punjab and its spirit of life depicting its major problem of substance abuse. But on the other has no issues in presenting the state as full of all merciless criminals like some kind of hidden tribute paid to the film CITY OF GOD, clearly displaying the lack of knowledge and research made by its entire team.
And in case this lack of research needs a proof then here it is caught in a scene (If I heard it properly), proving that there was no real Punjabi in its research team at all knowing the actual things.
The invisible flaw
As Shahid wakes up in the morning, after remaining unconscious in the night post a good beating given by the attacking goons, a background voice can be heard coming from a nearby Gurdwara reciting ‘Rehraas Sahib’.
Now as per the Sikh rituals, Rehraas Sahib is strictly to be read/sung in the evenings and not early mornings. For mornings it has to be ‘Asa Ki Vaar’ read/sung in the Gurdwaras.
But since there was no-one from Punjab to catch this minor flaw, the editor added whatever clip he was given in the backdrop without giving any serious thought.
(But if willing, the flaw can still be corrected while releasing the film’s official DVD).
Anyway coming to the conclusion (at last),
I readily agree to the statement made by Shyam Benegal that, ‘Technically it’s a well made film by all means including the cinematography and background score”.
Yes UDTA PUNJAB certainly has its strong merits and deserves to be seen as a must, especially for its terrific first half and its wonderful moments. But please don’t take it as any social message oriented film made against the drug menace in Punjab.
Watch it as a strictly commercial movie purposefully using the backdrop of Punjab and its regional characters led by a worth praising, splendid performance by Alia Bhatt.
But keep your thinking minds activated while watching the tricky film and addressing all friends living in different parts of the country and the world over, remember this is not the real PUNJAB of INDIA from any angle.
Rating : 3.5 - 1  = 2.5 / 5
(With the deduction made for the imbalanced depiction of PUNJAB full of all negative characters, purposefully misguiding the viewers painting a faulty picture.
And for the 2 songs, perfect to be played in the drug parties, that itself contradict the basic purpose of the film, IF it was made as a mission against the drug menace at all in the first place)
Tags : Udta Punjab Review by Bobby Sing, Udta Punjab Film Review by Bobby Sing, Inspired Films, Real Life Inspired Films, New Bollywood Movies Released, New Hindi Films Reviews, New Hindi Movies Reviews, New Hindi Movies Released, New Bollywood Reviews, Bobby Talks Cinema Review, Reviews By Bobby Sing, New Hindi Films Reviews at bobbytalkscinema.com, Inspired Films, World Cinema Inspired Films
 
 
18 June 2016 / bobbysing /
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A controversy certainly helps a film or a book before its scheduled release and there always is a counter allegation too that it’s all a pre-planned strategy of the PR agencies to ensure a great initial. However this time the clash really got into an ugly state with CBFC losing the case in the court forming the frontline news and the honorable judge also rightly reminding the exact phrase behind the abbreviation that happens to be ‘Central Board of Film Certification’ and not Censor Board as more widely or commonly quoted.
The case eventually divided the viewers into two big groups supporting and opposing the film for their own individual reasons. But in the process, they all sadly missed the other major issues showcased in the official trailer pointing towards the falling state of Punjabi mainstream music and singers, the issue of Bihari workers migrating to the city in big numbers and the role of Police & Politicians in the huge supply of these life-taking drugs in the state widely ignored by the central authorities.
Anyway, moving ahead of these infamous biased controversies and having personally witnessed the changing state of Punjab since the last 15 years, I have my own questions and fears regarding UDTA PUNJAB and its director’s basic vision behind using the backdrop of land of five rivers called Punjab, [meaning Panj (Five) Aab (Rivers)].
The questions would rightly give you an idea about how thin is the line UDTA PUNJAB is balancing upon that can easily be referred to as ‘playing with fire’. And I hope it doesn’t affect the image of the state adversely, sending a wrong message to the world in a partial manner.
Completing the process of a questionnaire, the detailed answers and the conclusion will be right there in my review to be shared post the decisive Friday.
But till then here are those crucial points I have in mind before going for the film :
1. What is the DISCLAIMER they are putting in the beginning of the film?
2. How close is Shahid Kapoor’s onscreen character to the famous Honey Singh and how they have indicated the same with what kind of similar reference?
3. What is the language spoken in the film? Is it Hindi, Punjabi or an awfully sounding mix of both? And can this be a crucial problem for the non-Punjabi speaking regions in terms of understanding the dialogues?
4. How ‘Bihari workers in Punjab’ are depicted on the screen and with what purpose through the character of Alia Bhatt?
5. How convincing is the reason of Diljit’s heart transformation in the film?
6.. What impact does Kareena makes in the role of an activist/journalist/nurse/doctor?
7. How are the songs ‘Chitta Veh’ & ‘Andar Da Kutta’ used in the sequences and do they result in any kind of influential provocation?
8. How justified is the use of Shiv Kumar Batalvi’s cult song in the script, sung by whom?
9. How clearly is Pakistan and state politicians shown linked to the drug business in Punjab?
10. How realistic is the abusive language used in the film in its major scenes? Was it really necessary or its just thrown in for the obvious reasons?
On a lighter or filmy note…..!
11. How funny is Satish Kaushik’s character taking care of the entertainment factor?
12. How is romance portrayed in the proceedings linking the various characters? Or Has the director simply kept the romantic element out making it too realistic?
On the very purpose of the film…..!
13. Can UDTA PUNJAB be a propaganda film in disguise having some political inclinations?
14. Is it a socially concerned movie made with a responsible purpose or just using the backdrop of Punjab to get some instant eyeballs and publicity?
15. Projected as a social drive against drugs, does it also have any focus on the state of rehabilitation centers operating in the regions or just skips that considering it as unimportant?
And lastly but most importantly
16. How PUNJAB and the people of the state are portrayed in the film stressing upon the drug menace? Is the depiction full of negativity or they have also shown the positive side too following a balanced approach?
----
Hope there are all encouraging answers to the above, giving us an entertaining as well as an enlightening film this Friday putting the controversies to rest. Otherwise it will be nothing short of opening a PANDORA BOX if it doesn’t turn out to be something made with a clear and socially concerned vision by the renowned makers.
So stay tuned for the answers coming in the review next.
HIS BLESSINGS
Tags : UDTA PUNJAB Pre-release Questions and Fears, A preview by Bobby Sing at bobbytalkscinema.com, Udta Punjab Preview by Bobby Sing, UDTA PUNJAB Expectations and Fears, Punjab and its drug issues.
 
 
15 June 2016 / bobbysing /
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